Decolonize Mainstream Politics: The Conservative’s Token Indian

Note: While my focus is on the USA, the horrors of colonization- then and now- occurred and still continue, all across Abya Yala.

mad-46338_640I received the video version of this post via social media. I got it more than once and from more than one Indigenous person. Its message, and the way my Indigenous relatives were lapping it up, broke my heart. The fact that the messenger is an Indigenous person, a woman, a Mother of Nations, only made it worse.

Then it pissed me off.

You see, this is some assimilating bullshit. So, let’s consider Ms. Mikaela Lyrea’s political message and compare it to the facts; “as…Native American.” Continue reading “Decolonize Mainstream Politics: The Conservative’s Token Indian”

Decolonizing Public Spaces: One Taino’s Perspective

columbus-866779_640There has been much said regarding monuments to confederate and colonizing “heroes”, on both sides of the debate. Some feel that removing the monuments is unwise: because we should revere history, because it cannot change the past, because it should remind Americans of our shame, because these monuments are public art and should cared for. Those who feel they should be torn down say it’s racist propaganda, it celebrates murder and destruction, the decimation of whole cultures. Both sides seem to have valid points, and I find myself, as a colonized Indigenous person, listening with 2 different sets of ears. It seems to me that the contrast here is the perspective from which these issues are being considered. Continue reading “Decolonizing Public Spaces: One Taino’s Perspective”

Are you a good witch or a bad witch?~ Segregation in Native American Spirituality

With the recent deaths occurring in an Arizona sweat lodge, three so far, many Indigenous Americans are rabidly repeating the mantras “That’s what you get when you mess with things you have no right to mess with”, “Non-natives have no right to participate, let alone conduct sacred native ceremonies” and “The spirits are clearly expressing their disapproval, when will non-natives learn?”

These are sad, angry and fear filled sentiments with which I do not agree.  They weigh in my heart as I hear my relations repeat them at family events, powwows and even sacred gatherings.  I have shared my feelings before pertaining to the separatist attitudes my relations have regarding our spirituality.  Yet, further understanding compels me to revisit the issue and clarify, albeit to myself, this particular concern.  Although I still do not agree with the segregationist views, I do believe my relations have some very good points and real reasons for concern.  However, I suggest pause and deliberation lest our fears overcome and misguide us.  By clarifying to ourselves exactly what it is that is really important, we can better express our concerns to others without sounding like rabid, bigoted hypocrites.

This is important because no one listens to rabid, bigoted hypocrites except other rabid, bigoted hypocrites and you end up preaching to the choir.

Continue reading “Are you a good witch or a bad witch?~ Segregation in Native American Spirituality”

Van Sertima’s Mummies or The Fruits of Careless Research…

Reply to a Critic

Recently, I received a response to the book review I posted on Ivan Van Sertima’s, They Came Before Columbus.  This person was very passionate about defending the Afrocentric version of alternative history and emailed me an excerpt from his later book, Early America Revisited, in which Van Sertima replies to his critics: scientists, archeologist and professionals from different, but related, fields of study.  I must say that his rebuttals prove quite an interesting read and encouraged me to further research, which I enjoy immensely.  However, I must also say that the additional information just didn’t help Ivan’s case.

Continue reading “Van Sertima’s Mummies or The Fruits of Careless Research…”

Seeking a leader; the need for a “Voice of Authority” for our dead language

Wisegeek.com states “A dead language is a language which is no longer learned as a native language.”  Wikipedia says that a dead language has no competent speakers and that an extinct language is one that has no speakers at all, be that by language replacement or language evolution.  Examples of these are Modern English having evolved from the Old English spoken in Medieval times and the death of the Taino language  of the Caribbean when replaced by Spanish and French.

Continue reading “Seeking a leader; the need for a “Voice of Authority” for our dead language”

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